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The Rev. Susan Sparks The Rev. Susan Sparks
The Rev. Susan Sparks is a former trial lawyer who now serves as senior pastor of Madison Avenue Baptist Church in New York, NY.

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American Baptist Churches USA

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Madison Avenue Baptist Church, New York, NY


Susan Sparks: Lord Give Me Patience . . . And Make It Snappy!

September 20, 2018

Our modern society can best be described in three words: fast, immediate, and instant! We speed walk, speed dial, and speed date. We disdain anything that takes extra time, including the US mail, which we affectionately call "snail mail" (an ironic nickname, given that 150 years ago, mail delivered by horseback was called "the pony express"). 

We even speed pray. Recently, while waiting in an inordinately long line at the DMV, I mumbled through gritted teeth, "Lord, give me patience." Almost without thinking, I then added, "And make it snappy!"
 
It's hard to have patience in a sound bite world. That said, it is a virtue worth cultivating. We see this lesson over and over in scripture.
            
Consider Hebrews 12:1: "Let us run with patience the race that is set before us."In short, life's a marathon, so pace yourself. 
 
Patience may be one of the best things we can do for our stamina and our health. Exhibit A: my Dad, Herb. A twentieth-century Buddha with a North Carolina accent, Herb was never in a hurry. Nothing ruffled him, and nothing phased him. His heart rate stayed the same through thick and thin (roughly seven beats per minute). Even though he lived on a diet of fried chicken, cream gravy, Frito scoops, and pecan pie, Herb made it to the ripe old age of 89. Why? Because he was patient. It'like the old saying goes, "It's better to be patient than to become one."
 
Patience also brings perspective. "Let every person be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger" (James 1:19). Similar advice came from a partner in my old law firm. He used to say, "always wait twenty-four hours before firing off an angry response." That suggestion has saved me from much unnecessary angst.

How many times have you fired off an email or a text in a knee-jerk reaction that you regretted, or spewed out words that you wish you could take back? With the buffer of time, you might have been able to see the issue or the person differently. In the end, what's the downside of waiting to respond? If it's that big of an issue, it'll be there tomorrow.    
   
The opportunity for growth is perhaps the most important gift we receive from practicing patience. The Bible says, "Be patient, then, brothers and sisters . . . See how the farmer waits for the land to yield its valuable crop, patiently waiting for the autumn and spring rains" (James 5:7)Its too bad that we don't treat others like farmers treat their crops, enabling their growth through patient tending.

Too often we get impatient with people-finishing their sentences, tuning out if they take too long to tell a story, or taking over their jobs if they don't do the work quickly enough or in the way that we want. 

The author Paulo Coelho tells the story of a man watching a butterfly struggling to emerge from its cocoon. The man decides to help the butterfly by cutting open the cocoon to free it. What he fails to realize is that the effort required to break free from the cocoon is nature's way of strengthening the butterfly's wings. By trying to accelerate the process, the man destroys the butterfly's ability to fly. 

Similarly, we can clip people's wings through our own impatience. It takes time for things and people to strengthen and grow into their potential. We must have patienceto allow them that room. 

This week, when you feel your patience waning, ask yourself: is this worth my health? In twenty-four hours, will my perspective change? Is this something or someone that needs extra time to develop fully? 

Patience is a virtue worth cultivating. Try it. Just breathe. Take a beat before you respond. Be gentle with those you love. And if all else fails, then use this simple prayer to get you started: "Lord give me patience . . . and make it snappy!"
 
(This piece was featured as a nationally syndicated column for GateHouse Media. To read this and other columns,click here!)


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