The Rev. Dr. Monty Knight

Denomination: Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) (CC(DC))

The Reverend Dr. Monty Knight is an ordained Baptist minister who also holds clergy standing in the Christian Church (Disciples) and the United Church of Christ. A native of southern Illinois, he has been a pastoral counselor in Charleston, South Carolina for many years where he continues to teach and train clinical counselors and write extensively.

Monty has more than 50 years of experience as a minister, counselor, teacher, and clinical supervisor of counselors. He was the pastor of the historic First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Charleston from 1994 to 2010.

He holds bachelor's and master's degrees from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, an M.Div. from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and a D.Min. from Princeton Theological Seminary.

He is the author of the book, Balanced Living: Don't Let Your Strength Become a Weakness, as well as numerous articles in newspapers, magazines, and journals.

Visit his website at www.drmontyknightcounseling.com

Day1 Weekly Programs by The Rev. Dr. Monty Knight

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Monty Knight: On Knowing Not How to Pray

Tuesday July 21, 2020
In his sermon on Romans 8, Dr. Monty Knight asks us, Is it possible that God may work in and through, with and for, in spite of, as often as not, because of us? Even in our praying?

Monty Knight: The Sacred Sound of Silence

Tuesday August 08, 2017
Based on the story of Elijah in 1 Kings 19, Dr. Monty Knight says we can learn much about ourselves and our lives in the gentle silence of God’s presence. The truly sacred more often finds us than we can find it.

Articles by The Rev. Dr. Monty Knight

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Monty Knight: Evangelical or Fundamentalist?

Sunday July 12, 2020
When one reads or hears the media’s use of the word “evangelical” these days, referring to particular forms of Protestant Christian political posturing, is it more precisely a reference to Protestant Christian “fundamentalism”? The latter term has become chronically confused with the former, but they mean something quite different.